Restoring Wood Windows with Bob Yapp

Photo: Yalecrest resident Rob Foye at work.
Last month I was fortunate to participate in a “Wood Window Repair and Weatherization Workshop” taught by Bob Yapp.  It was one of 3 classes put together by SLC Planning, Preservation Utah and the SLC RDA.  

Mr. Yapp is a renowned historic preservation expert.  In 1996 he created a series for PBS called “About Your House with Bob Yapp.”  Later he opened the Belvedere School for Historic Preservation.
2-EPK_9268

Bob Yapp with class participants

Having a hands-on class is a great way to learn.  Each class restored a traditional double-hung wood window.  We learned about safe paint removal, glazing, putty replacement, weather-stripping, and sash re-installation.  It was amazing how easily (and cheaply!) one can fix an old wood window so that it can do its job even better than before and last another 100+ years.

 


While working on the window sashes we also talked about energy efficiency and sustainability.  I wish I could remember the number of windows thrown into landfills each year.  It was astronomical.  Did you know…
  • It will take a consumer 40+ years to get any payback from replacement windows with insulated glass.
  • PVC or vinyl is the most toxic consumer substance manufactured today.  It can’t be recycled, off gasses toxic fumes and has contraction and expansion issues. It fades, cracks and has a maximum lifespan of 16 to 18 years.
  • Restored wood windows have another 100-year economic life before total restoration is needed again.  Replacement windows can never be restored effectively.
During our lunch break Bob said one of the great things about history and historic preservation is that it brings all kinds of people together.  Recently I attended an Entrada Institute presentation on the visual history of Wayne County.  The room was filled with people from a variety of political and religious backgrounds, old-timers and relative new-comers together.   With the photos and shared stories I saw appreciation, respect and even shared laughter.  Bob was right.  It really was NICE.
 
The info and conversations with Bob and the other class participants made this workshop great.  It was a lot of fun.   I highly recommend the class.
 
 
Note:  Top 4 photos courtesy of Ed Kosmicki.
— Kelly Marinan

Winter 1916-1917

It was the week before Christmas and it just kept snowing every day!  After all the snow, came the wind and the cold.  This created quite a challenge for Yalecrest residents and the entire city of Salt Lake.  What was it like here 100 years ago????   Here is a glimpse from the papers:

SNOW REMOVAL

The City hired extra laborers to help with the snow.  Unemployed men, and those looking for some extra cash, got work shoveling downtown.  Wagonloads of snow taken from the sidewalks and gutters of the business district would first get deposited on State Street between 100 and 200 South.  Later that snow would be hauled off and dumped into a canal near 13th South or transferred on freight cars to North Salt Lake.  The snow wasn’t removed from the main part of the roads.  The expectation was an upcoming thaw would allow them to “flush” the streets later.  Snow plows drawsnow_and_auto_in_front_of_studebaker_brothers_mar1917n by horses went over the sidewalks in residential areas.

Thaddeus Naylor (the guy that sold us land for Uintah School, whose half-brother would later live at 1715 Harvard Ave) wasn’t very happy with all the snow and congestion in front of his shop on State St.  It made it more difficult for him to sell studebakers.  He threatened the City with injunction proceedings.

Herbert Auerbach (remember Auerbach’s store?) came to the rescue.  He offered his field just north of the City County Building as a big dumping ground for the snow.  This saved the City a big chunk of money… and made business owners on State Street happy.

STREETCARS

The long and steady snowfall resulted in the streetcar rails becoming slippery with ice and snow.  By Dec 21st every streetcar line in SLC was experiencing difficulties.  It was becoming the worst storm the City had seen in 42 years.  Initially, the snow was wet and heavy.   Precipitation got lighter, but a full day of winds averaging 30 mph didn’t help.  Huge snowdrifts developed.  The tramway company’s plows and sweeper cars couldn’t keep up.  Travel slowed.  Derailments occurred.  You couldn’t make it up the hill.  Yalecrest’s 15th East streetcar line went out of commission.  Same with the line to Fort Douglas.  Emigration Canyon reported drifts between 15 and 40 feet deep.

They say automobiles contributed to the streetcars’ problems.  As soon as a sweeper car would go by the autos would jump on the tracks, seeing them as their only thoroughfare.  The auto tires would push more snow onto the rails and then pack it down to form ice which could lift the streetcars off the rails.  It was sometimes hard for the sweeper cars to get around the derailed cars.

Yalecrest resident Edward Ashton and a couple other builder/realtor guys approached the City Commissioners insisting that the City help fix the streetcar problems.  The Commissioners wanted to help, but they weren’t sure they could use taxpayer money to aid a private company.  They needed time to look into the matter.  Eventually they did loan City equipment because they believed mass transit was vital to SLC.  One called it “the poor man’s means of transportation.”

COAL

jeffery_distributing_co_trucks_and_trailers_dec12_1916

It wasn’t until Jan 5th that the City could begin clearing the streets in the neighborhoods… because they had loaned their equipment to the Utah Light & Traction Company.  Even with half-loads on their horse teams, coal distributers said they had an especially hard time getting up the hills on the east side, but said the public was “very charitable in the way of criticism.”

wasatch_coal_co_teams_in_yard_feb1917

 

In Utah and across the country people were talking a lot about problems with coal delivery and the fear of a shortage.  The issue in SLC had a lot to do with the recent weather.  It increased demand and caused transportation problems for trains bringing in the coal and for the dealers delivering it.  Some citizens struggled for heat.  Poor people couldn’t afford to buy a lot at once, they had no reserves.  Some wealthier folks didn’t have an immediate need but kept ordering and hoarding it, according to some dealers.  Dealers also blamed the railroads and producers for not giving them enough.  Producers blamed the railroads.  The railroads in turn blamed the dealers saying the dealers got their coal but weren’t distributing it properly.  People were complaining and pointing fingers everywhere… which brought in the State Legislature.  Was the problem with the railroads, the coal producers, the distributers, the City?  How can this problem be avoided in the future?

OUR SCHOOLS

On Tues morning Jan 9th, Uintah Elementary kids were told to turn around and go back home because there wasn’t enough coal to heat the classrooms.  A truck hauling 4 tons of coal had gotten stuck in a snow drift not far away.

About a week later, the East Bench experienced a blizzard that canceled school for the Uintah
kids and created a very dramatic scene over at East High.   Yalecrest resident and math teacher John Cathcart (1555 E 900 South) along with other teachers and the stronger schoolboys formed “rescue parties” that ventured out into the freezing wind and snow to save the lives of those struggling across two blocks on 13th East between the stalled streetcars and the school.  Part of East High was converted into an emergency room.  Doctors were called to the school.  The doctors phoned the police asking them to “Send out some whiskey.  The children are freezing.”  whiskey

The cops rushed to the school.  Other teachers and students were put to work rubbing snow on the hands, feet and ears of the frozen rescued students.

OUR WATER SUPPLY

reservoir_13the_nov1936The City’s water supply began to dwindle after too many nights where the low was in the single digits.  The City Commissioners contemplated a $500 fine(!!) for those caught wasting water, leaving their taps open to prevent their pipes from freezing.  Mayor Ferry put out a proclamation begging good citizens to use water sparingly and not waste it at night.  But two of the City’s reservoirs, including the one on 13th East, went dry because of frozen canyon streams and all the water wasting.  Almost a quarter of the City was without water, homes on East South Temple and in the higher elevations.

If the pipes were empty where you lived, you needed to open your hot water taps to allow steam to escape.  If not, you could have an explosion in your home.  The latter is what happened to Yalecrest resident Royal Wight (932 S. 15th East)  when he was building a fire in his kitchen stove and the heat from the fire forced steam through the frozen water jacket.  Royal was temporarily knocked unconscious when a part of the stove hit him in the head during the explosion.

–Kelly Marinan

Photos:  Used by permission, Utah State Historical Society, all rights reserved.

  • Studebaker Bros Co on State St, Mar 1917.
  • Jeffery Distributing Co coal trucks, Dec 12, 1916.
  • Wasatch Coal Co teams in yard, Feb 1917.
  • Reservoir on 13th East, Nov 1936.

Sources:
12-20-1916, Salt Lake Herald, “Snowfall Boon to Jobless of City”.
12-21-1916, SL Herald, “T.W. Naylor Protests”.
12-22-1916, SL Herald, “Street Cars Impeded by Heavy Snowfall”.
12-25-1916, SL Tribune, “Traffic Is Delayed by Furious Storms”.
12-27-1916, SL Tribune, “Storm King Hits City Another Knockout Blow”.
12-27-1916, SL Telegram, “Snow Dumped in Field”.
12-28-1916, SL Herald, “Salt Lake Shivers at Six Above”.
12-29-1916, SL Herald, “Mountain of Snow in Auerbach Field Testifies to Storm”.
12-29-1916, SL Telegram, “More Car Lines are Operating; Better Weather Clears Tracks”.
1-1-1917, SL Telegram, “Snowfall Heaviest Since that of 1874”.
1-5-1917, SL Tribune, “Clearing of Snow is Costly to City”.
1-9-1917, SL Tribune, “Snow Holds Back Coal Deliveries”.
1-9-1917, SL Telegram, “School Closed as Fuel Runs Short”.
1-16-1917, SL Telegram, “Corps of Doctors Rush to Aid of School”.
1-17-1917, SL Tribune, “Coal Jams Yards, Railroad Man Says”.
1-17-1917, SL Tribune, “Snow Blast Traps 200 at East High, Students Escape Death in Blizzard”.
1-17-1917, SL Telegram, “Wasting of City Water Deplored”.
1-17-1917, SL Tribune, “Four Hurt when Frozen Pipes Burst”.
1-18-1917, SL Telegram, “Scarcity of Water Imperils City”.

Celebrating History (2016)

K.E.E.P.’s History Committee continues to learn and have fun.  I thought I’d share on our more recent activities.

Auditorium4AwardsIn April we helped judge student-produced documentaries for the Utah History Day State Competition.  The top winners in various categories will be competing this month in Washington D.C. at the National History Day Contest.  It was a great pleasure to meet youth so enthusiastic about history and so darn INCREDIBLY SMART and TALENTED!  Go, Utah!

In May we dropped in at the Salt Lake County Archives during their 30 Year Anniversary Celebration… where we chatted with more history-loving folks and received a nice tour.  We greatly appreciate the help they have given us.  And it was nice meeting others that also enjoy utilizing the SLCo Archives.  (Have you ever seen chattel mortgage records?  They have them.)
archives-30         Archives Event

We know not everyone can attend K.E.E.P.’s one-day Walking Tour events.  So… we decided to put the tour into a new format and try taking it on the road to share with more people.  Our “Tour on Tour” participants have hailed from Sarah Daft, Parklane, St. Joseph’s Villa, Chateau Brickyard and Brookdale.  It’s been fun!

Parklane  RidingWithV

StJoesVillaEvery time we do a presentation or a ride-along, we hear questions and comments that either make us chuckle, teach us something, or have us doing more research to find the answers to improve our tour.   Speaking of which– for those that missed it last October (and those curious about how the tour has changed)

Please Join Us!
Thursday – June 16th
6:30pm – Foothill Library
for a slideshow presentation that will take you on
our Yalecrest Oldest Homes Tour.
–Kelly Marinan

Same but Different – Signs of Spring

This photo was taken in the 1930’s on the 1700 block of Harvard Ave.

Gone are the skate keys, longs skirts and cool retro hats.  But the kids are still here.  You can see them wearing helmets as they move down the sidewalks skating or riding their bikes.  You might also see them on razors, skateboards, and even motorized scooters and hoverboards!

–Kelly Marinan

Photo: Courtesy of K. Lewis

The Naylor Home

1715 Harvard (30's and 2013)

This Period Revival home on Harvard Ave was built in 1929 by the Doxey-Layton Company.  Graham Doxey (of Doxey Real Estate) and Howard Layton (of Layton Construction) were Yalecrest residents that joined together to build and sell homes.

William and Emily Naylor were the first owners and long time residents.  The 1940 census has 6 adults living in the home:  William E. and his wife Emily, their 3 adult children (Audrey, Evelyn and William J.) and Emily’s mom (Mary James).  Mr. Naylor was his own boss working in the grocery store business.  Mrs Naylor and her mother came from Ireland.  Audrey had graduated from college and was working as a school teacher.  Evelyn was employed as a stenographer.  And William J. was in his 1st year of college and working as a grocery store clerk.

Mr Naylor passed away in 1966 at the age of 84.  For at least 20 years he owned and operated Dickinson’s Market (2nd S. near 7th East, now a parking lot).  The family lived in the back of the store for a couple years.  Mr Naylor was well-respected in the community.  He served as president of the Salt Lake Retail Butcher’s and Grocer’s Association, was a captain in the Utah National Guard, served as board director in at least 3 organizations, worked in the government’s War Assets Administration, and later entered the real estate business.

Emily James Naylor immigrated to the the U.S. when she was a teenager.  She lived to be 95.  The home stayed in the Naylor family for more than 55 years.  Their eldest daughter Audrey (born in 1906) was still living here in the late 1980’s.

——- Connection to early SLC history:

Naylor Brothers AdWilliam E. Naylor was a direct descendent of the “Naylor Brothers.”  The Naylor brothers consisted of Thomas (1826-1872), William (1835-1918) and George (1837-1922).

The brothers were born in England where they joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.  They came to Utah with the early Mormon settlers, most likely with the 1852 John S. Higbee Company.George Naylor photo

The Naylor Brothers manufactured some of the first wagons built in Utah.  Together they were skilled blacksmiths, woodworkers and mechanics.

William E. Naylor was one of the sons of George Naylor and his 2nd wife Fanny Wiscombe.

As the popularity of wagons and carriages began to dwindle, George Naylor started selling Studebakers.  At one time SLC boasted a Studebaker showroom in the Naylor Building (100 S. block of State Street).

–Kelly Marinan

Early Yalecrest Preservationists

DUP May 1933

You can call this group “early Yalecrest preservationists” because historic preservation is really about people and building community.  It’s people coming together to learn, honor and celebrate our past and present… and working together on our shared future.  That’s what I see in this picture of the Yale Camp Daughters of Utah Pioneers.

This May 1933 Yalecrest photo, taken in front of Blanche Bower’s home at 1097 S. 15th East, shows the gals participating in a “Silver Tea” (an older fancy term for fundraiser).

Over the years, lots of Yalecrest women were active participants in Daughters of Utah Pioneers.  Meetings were held in various homes in our neighborhood.  Yale Camp’s first official meeting was held at “Daughter” Cecil Besley’s house, 955 S. 1300 East, in 1924.  At that meeting “Captain” Elizabeth Liddle made a plea for the preservation of historical material and relics… kind of like K.E.E.P. today.

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but here are some of the neighborhood women that hosted meetings in the 1920’s:

Mary Ellen Rockwood @ 1317 Gilmer
Ethel Scalley @ 1327 Yale
Amy Pratt Romney @ 1337 Gilmer
Ida Kirkham @ 1345 Normandie Circle
Rose Hall @ 1432 Gilmer
Bernice Rogers @1452 Gilmer
Odelia Tebbs @ 1515 Laird
Flora Collett @ 1515 Princeton
Margaret Eccles @ 1521 Harvard
Ida Miller @ 1527 Michigan
Laura Silver @ 1539 Harvard
Zelpha Yates @ 948 Greenwood Terrace
Mildred Jenkins @ 1646 Yale

Sources:
“Yale Camp” by Daughters of Utah Pioneers, 1933.
Salt Lake Telegram

–Kelly Marinan

Where Is It?

DouglasPark20

 

Where is it?  If you said, “Yalecrest,” you are absolutely correct.  Yalecrest is one neighborhood that was originally created as multiple subdivisions.  This snapshot is from a map of the Douglas Park Subdivision.  As to exactly where in Yalecrest this area can be seen today… here are a few hints to help you:

  1.  That is Michigan Ave coming in on the west/left and veering north.
  2.  Replace “Vista” with “Hubbard Ave”
  3.  Replace “Williams” with “Michigan Ave”
  4.  Replace “Roeber St” with “1500 East” and move that street east/right a bit.

Douglas Park was platted by the Douglas Heights Land and Improvement Company in Jan 1911.  E. W. Williams and Lou D. Sweet signed the Owner’s Dedication as officers of the company.  The streets didn’t turn out exactly as they were initially envisioned when this subdivision was platted over 100 years ago.  But, it’s pretty darn close!

— Kelly Marinan